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in summary
Nikolaus (Perchtkloasa)
St. Nicholas Eve on December 5th is as much longed for as feared by the children of the Likatier tribe. Of course they are looking forward to the bag filled with nuts, apples, oranges and often a homemade pastry. The only reason to be frightened is the dosage form caused by Santa Claus, who seems to be too evil. In Likatien this is not the traditional Bishop Nicholas, who is known from the Catholic tradition, but wild, untamed beings from the followers of the Percht, an archaic mother-goddess, who is known in the culture area Bavaria/Tyrol. In their own language, the inhabitants of this area call the ogres of the Percht followers "the Kloasa". Dressed only in skins, accompanied by the noise of the big bells and bells, the hair and beard so long that their soot-covered faces are not recognizable, the perch toilet comes into the room where the whole tribe is gathered.

In the foreground the children sit, the youngest flee anxiously to their mothers and older siblings. When the wild men beat with the brushwood in their direction, then they all shrug together, no matter what age they are. The Kloasa then stand in the middle of the room and bring out the Golden Book. In this book it says what the children and young people have done all year round. If they are all too cheeky, they can get one with the tail over. At the end they are praised, lovable qualities are highlighted and then they receive the said bag as a gift. Until late into the evening everyone sits together comfortably.

 


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